Bridget's Adventures in the Towel Cupboard

Fiction By Bridget // 6/1/2009

Part One: The Beginning of the Whole Thing

Once upon a time there was a young girl named Bridget. She had chestnut hair and dark eyes and was extremely attractive and ever so funny and charming and intelligent and….. well, anyway, one day she was sitting in her room, reading a book she had read only once before, and thinking to herself, “Wouldn’t it be nice if there really was magic? I bet there is; I just haven’t found it yet. I’ll find it one day, just wait and see.” It was at this moment her mother called her in to do dishes. Bridget groaned. Dishes had to be her least favorite chore in the world. “Change the towel before you start, Bridget.” her mother said. The towel was just something to set the dishes on, as they had far too many dishes to set all of them on the dish rack.

The towel cupboard was an intimidating structure, tall, wide, and deep. Now you ask me, ‘Writer, how can a towel cupboard be intimidating? It’s just a towel cupboard.’ Aha, maybe so, but this was a special towel cupboard, and although it was not obvious, certain people could sense that this was no ordinary towel cupboard, and Bridget was one of these.

There were no towels in the front. Crud, they must all be in the laundry, she thought. She reached back farther just to make sure, and a sweet smell, like warm grass and roses, hit her in the face. Her mother must have placed one of those sachets in the back. But it smelled fresher than that. Curious, she climbed up to the shelf it seemed to seemed to be coming from and crawled farther in. This cupboard was the type that was large enough for that.

The smell became stronger, and sweeter, and Bridget went forward a few more feet. It was then that she realized that this cupboard should have stopped by now. “If this were magic,” she thought, “there would be grass, not just wood. The cupboard doesn’t go on forever.” And then, there was grass. Soft, lush, beautifully green grass, and the wood floor of the cupboard disappeared. When she looked behind her, there was no trace of the towel cupboard at all. It was like a dream. “Like magic.” she thought.

It was twilight here, the moon just starting to peek above the horizon on one side, and the sun just setting in a splendor of purple and orange and pink at the other. There were roses all around, and the grass was still warm underfoot. There was no one about, it seemed. It was quiet and peaceful, and everyone knows it is rarely so when there are humans around. Or any creatures, for that matter.

She wondered if anyone had ever lived here, and where she was, and if it had a name. “Well,” she thought, “if no one lives here, then I suppose I’ll have to name it myself.” She strolled along, bending and smelling a rose here, – oh, they were every color: deep purple, ocean blue, midnight black, blood red, brilliant orange, and the brightest of pinks, and they smelled heavenly – touching the softness of the grass there, and feeling the magic in the air, as she pondered names in her mind.

It could have been an hour later, and it could have been just minutes – time had no value there – when she looked up and gasped at the stars. Now she knew what people meant when they said the stars looked as if you could touch them. She actually tried to, and was certain she was just an inch away – if she were only just the slightest bit taller! They were larger and brighter and, quite simply, just more real.

Up until now, there had been no trees, at least not that she had noticed. Now, pines randomly dotted the landscape before her. They were dark green and majestic, rising high over her head. Somehow, straining to look at the tips of them, she realized she was tired, and she yawned impressively. Searching for a place to sleep, her eyes fell upon a smaller tree, a baby tree, really, and the soft grass underneath. She fell asleep moments after she lay her head down.

~*~*~*~

Something was growling, Bridget realized, quietly maybe, but definitely growling. She wasn’t sure if she should open her eyes, but curiosity overcame her, and she tentatively opened them just a little. Nothing was there. Except grass and trees, and – where on earth? Then she remembered. She also realized she was starving. That had been the growling noise, she guessed. At least, she hoped so. But it seemed as uninhabited as it had the night before. She would need water and food – soon.

Pulling herself up, she looked around her. The sky was endlessly blue, not a cloud in sight. To the right was the rose land. She didn’t know what else to call it; you couldn’t exactly call it a garden. To her left were trees; farther on, they thickened and became a forest. She wanted to go back through the bower of roses, but she had seen no food or water there, and from what she had read, you could find berries and roots in the forest. She didn’t exactly know how one would go about digging up the correct roots, but she knew how to pick berries, and which ones were and were not poisonous, assuming the berries here were the same as the ones at home.

So she set off for the forest. The forest was beautiful. The trees were dark green, and sweet-smelling pine needles were scattered over the ground. As she walked, she heard nothing. “There should be something – maybe birds chirping, or squirrels and rabbits chasing each other – but something.” But there was nothing. The silence wasn’t ominous, just – silence – but it was beginning to make her wonder. Why were there flowers blooming at every turn and trees towering high, but no animals? Why was there grass, and water rushing if – water rushing! She ran towards the direction it came from. When she reached it, she stood transfixed, gazing down at the miracle in front of her.

A small stream trickled and danced across rose-colored stones – no, that’s wrong, roses seemed to be every color there – across deep pink stones that lay on a bed of pure silver. She reached down into it. Water lapped at her arm as she fingered the silver dust that lay at the bottom. “Fairy dust.” she thought. “It must be.” She cupped her hand and dipped out some of the water. It was clear, pure-tasting, but it also had a hint of raspberry.

After she had drunk her fill, she stood up to get her bearings. Where were her bearings? She couldn’t seem to find them. Instead of bearings, she found berries. They were small and purple and entirely unfamiliar, but she had no choice. They were sweet, and apparently nonpoisonous.

What seemed like hours later, she stepped out of the forest and into the sunshine. She was on top of a hill. Below her was the forest; farther away was a patch of colors. “That must be the rose bower.” she thought. Other than that, everything was green. Until she looked up. The mountains above her were brown, yellow and gray. Dead. It made her feel sick. Behind her, a pair of green eyes watched closely.

Comments

Ok, guys, my parents think

Ok, guys, my parents think I'm having trouble with grammar, so any comments of that sort would be appreciated. But tell me about the general feel of the story and whether or not you like it, too.

"True love is the greatest thing in the world - except for a nice MLT - mutton, lettuce and tomato sandwich, when the mutton is nice and lean, and the tomato is ripe." - Miracle Max, from The Princess Bride

Bridget | Mon, 06/01/2009

"I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth. Then I ask myself the same question." - Harun Yahya

Lol, I liked this. I thought

Lol, I liked this. I thought the grammar was just fine (and I'm a grammar/spelling freak), except for this part (and one other when Bridget was thinking):
"Change the towel before you start, Bridget." her mother said. It kind of chops it up. The rest seemed to be fine though, as well as in your other stories, so it was probably a typo?

~Erin~

"Even if I could, I wouldn't. Scars can come in handy. I have one on my left knee that is the perfect map of the London Underground....." Professor Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

"I'm not skerd." Adam Lambert

Erin | Tue, 06/02/2009

"You were not meant to fit into a shallow box built by someone else." -J. Raymond

Hmm, maybe I could fix that

Hmm, maybe I could fix that when I become a monthly writer. If I become a monthly writer. I still haven't heard back from Ben yet. How long does it usually take?

"True love is the greatest thing in the world - except for a nice MLT - mutton, lettuce and tomato sandwich, when the mutton is nice and lean, and the tomato is ripe." - Miracle Max, from The Princess Bride

Bridget | Tue, 06/02/2009

"I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth. Then I ask myself the same question." - Harun Yahya

For me it only took about

For me it only took about two days or so. But it doesn't sound like Ben has been able to get on very much lately...

~Erin~

"Even if I could, I wouldn't. Scars can come in handy. I have one on my left knee that is the perfect map of the London Underground....." Professor Dumbledore, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone

"I'm not skerd." Adam Lambert

Erin | Tue, 06/02/2009

"You were not meant to fit into a shallow box built by someone else." -J. Raymond

I liked this! But is this

I liked this! But is this the end?

*************************************************
The hardness of God is kinder than the softness of men, and His compulsion is our liberation-
C.S.Lewis

Laura Elizabeth | Mon, 06/15/2009

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The best stories are those that are focused, unassuming, and self-confident enough to trust the reader to figure things out. --

http://lauraeandrews.blogspot.com/2014/05/dont-tell-me-hes-smart.html

No, I submitted more, but it

No, I submitted more, but it hasn't been accepted yet. It's taking forever. Actually, you can go to the message board and all that I've written so far is there.

"It is man's inherent nature to scare himself silly for no good reason." - Calvin and Hobbes

Bridget | Mon, 06/15/2009

"I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth. Then I ask myself the same question." - Harun Yahya

Memory

This makes me think of Edmund teasing Lucy about discoving new lands in the kitchen cupboards...

Julie | Sun, 06/28/2009

Formerly Kestrel

Yeah, I thought of Narnia

Yeah, I thought of Narnia after I wrote this and realized it was similar.  But the way the story is going in my head, it's a lot different later on.

Bridget | Sun, 06/28/2009

"I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth. Then I ask myself the same question." - Harun Yahya

Here's your Apricot pie! This

Here's your Apricot pie! This is what AP delivery is. When you read my little thing, I'll send an AP (comment).
Comments are like an AP. Sweet 'n yummy. (Sometimes.)

Anyway, I see no grammer probs. I would hate bing lost there though. I Wouldn't mind have a drink of that water.  

I am Nate-Dude | Sun, 09/20/2009

Nate-Dude

Cool!  I like AP delivery. 

Cool!  I like AP delivery.  So, apricot pie is sweet and yummy?  I can't say I've ever had one, but I don't think I'd like it.  Is it heretical to say I hate apricots?  Have YOU ever had an apricot pie?

Bridget | Mon, 09/21/2009

"I always wonder why birds stay in the same place when they can fly anywhere on the earth. Then I ask myself the same question." - Harun Yahya

Yes I have had an apricot

Yes I have had an apricot pie(you can read the story to that in my poem, Ode to Apricot). I hate apricots too. But an apricot pie taste just like a peach pie.

Glad you liked your APD!

I am Nate-Dude | Tue, 09/22/2009

Nate-Dude